January 26, 2014
"Trust your heart if the seas catch fire, live by love though the stars walk backwards."

— E.E. Cummings (via emmauri)

(Source: everpresentcoffee, via emmauri)

January 26, 2014

rookiemag:

Sunday Video: How to Do a Rainbow Kick With St. Vincent

Annie Clark teaches you some sweet soccer moves.

Love this

January 23, 2014
"The “10,000-hour rule” — that this level of practice holds the secret to great success in any field — has become sacrosanct gospel, echoed on websites and recited as litany in high-performance workshops. The problem: it’s only half true. If you are a duffer at golf, say, and make the same mistakes every time you try a certain swing or putt, 10,000 hours of practicing that error will not improve your game. You’ll still be a duffer, albeit an older one."

Debunking the Myth of the 10,000-Hours Rule – the real science of what it actually takes to achieve genius-level excellence in any field (via explore-blog)

This immediately made me think of Sarah Kay’s amazing poem “Postcards”Practice does not make perfect. Practice makes permanent. Repeat the same mistakes over and over and you don’t get any closer to Carnegie Hall; even I know that.

(Source: , via explore-blog)

January 22, 2014
theatlantic:

3D Printing and Legos: Perfect Together

There is a little thrill in watching something you designed get built, layer by layer, by a 3D printer.
But it’s a slow thrill.
3D printing, even for a small object, can take a loooooong time. If you’re just trying to make a little widget on a one-off basis, (say a piece for a board game or something), a little wait while one strip of plastic is extruded upon another is no big deal. But for professional designers, speed is, doctoral student Stefanie Mueller says, “mission critical.”
According to Mueller, designers often allow their plans to print overnight, so as to waste less time. But that limits them to “a single iteration per day.” Over a whole design process, that really gums up the works. “A typical iteration process when refining a prototype easily adds up to a week—even though the actual design work may not have taken longer than a day,” she wrote to me. The whole process gets bottlenecked at the 3D printer.
This is why Mueller built faBrickator, a program that marries 3D printing with a building material beloved around the world: Legos. Using faBrickator, designers can sub Legos into their designs, and only print small pieces.
Read more. [Image: Stefanie Mueller]

theatlantic:

3D Printing and Legos: Perfect Together

There is a little thrill in watching something you designed get built, layer by layer, by a 3D printer.

But it’s a slow thrill.

3D printing, even for a small object, can take a loooooong time. If you’re just trying to make a little widget on a one-off basis, (say a piece for a board game or something), a little wait while one strip of plastic is extruded upon another is no big deal. But for professional designers, speed is, doctoral student Stefanie Mueller says, “mission critical.”

According to Mueller, designers often allow their plans to print overnight, so as to waste less time. But that limits them to “a single iteration per day.” Over a whole design process, that really gums up the works. “A typical iteration process when refining a prototype easily adds up to a week—even though the actual design work may not have taken longer than a day,” she wrote to me. The whole process gets bottlenecked at the 3D printer.

This is why Mueller built faBrickator, a program that marries 3D printing with a building material beloved around the world: Legos. Using faBrickator, designers can sub Legos into their designs, and only print small pieces.

Read more. [Image: Stefanie Mueller]

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Filed under: want 
January 19, 2014

rookiemag:

Sunday Video: Lucius

The premiere of a new video for “Go Home.”

This is so good you guys

January 18, 2014
newyorker:

A cartoon by Bruce Eric Kaplan. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/19pATON

newyorker:

A cartoon by Bruce Eric Kaplan. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/19pATON

(Source: newyorker.com)

3:08pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z-iN_v14hio5n
  
Filed under: yup 
January 17, 2014
"Dance music … stirs some barbaric instinct — lulled asleep in our sober lives — you forget centuries of civilization in a second, & yield to that strange passion which sends you madly whirling round the room."

— For your Friday night: Party like it’s 1903 — 21-year-old Virginia Woolf on the ecstasy of dancing in a remarkable entry from her diary. (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

January 16, 2014

explore-blog:

Flow is a floating instrument that “lives and breathes and responds to the river” – amazing sensor-driven electroacoustic machinery that sets the water to music. Best thing since the Solar System set to music

This is everything I love most in interactive art.

(Source: )

January 13, 2014
Important reminder.

Important reminder.

(Source: dazzling-kimshan)

January 5, 2014

Arjan van Hof

One of the few life goals I am extremely wedded to and feel very passionate about is seeing the Northern Lights in person.

Arjan van Hof

One of the few life goals I am extremely wedded to and feel very passionate about is seeing the Northern Lights in person.

(Source: naturalpalettes, via naturalpalettes)

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